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Jeff Farris
Most opposing youth coaches have the same goals (with one exception) and problems. Unfortunately, they seldom have much time to help each other. Even if they did, many opposing coaches do not know each other well enough to admit a problem and solicit advice. So, the one group of people who can most help a coach are often the ones least frequently called.

One way for coaches to build these relationships is to introduce themselves to each other before a game and exchange business cards with contact information. This simple exchange of information lets coaches ask questions long after a game and learn how certain things demonstrated by a team were developed by the coach. It lets coaches communicate at their convenience away from the rush of after game distractions. While there may be certain coaches who view these tips as providing a proprietary advantage, the better ones will be glad to see some of their hard-learned techniques passed along.

In most leagues, introductions before a game are not a common practice. When first practiced, some coaches may find the opposing coach surprised. However, over time and as the benefits of improved communication become evident, it is a practice that can improve the game for everyone.

Monday, September 08, 2003 @ 10:36 am   9636 Views   Jeff Farris